Jobsite of the Week: Golden Fields

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This Jobsite of the Week comes to us from Mike at Chewelah Painting. This one was big, so we'll leave the job breakdown to Mike...

The jobsite is located 10 miles south of Harrington, WA in a large
region of agricultural land known for its abundant wheat harvests
called, The Palouse.



The barn and chicken house was built in 2007 and painted with SW
Duration by the homeowner.  The substrate was T&G Cedar that was never
primed because in 2007 Duration was marketed as primer and paint in
one.  We chased out a lot of peeling paint that would come up in
sheets.  Once scraped, some carpentry repairs were performed at the
homeowners request.  The building was caulked with Sashco Big Stretch
Caulking, all bare wood primed and brushed using Zinsser CoverStain
oil primer tinted to gray.  We stayed with Duration paint on the
topcoats.  2 applications of Duration were sprayed and backrolled.
Interesting fact- the barn has a second story basketball court, where
the owner's daughter practiced her game.

 

The house was getting its first repaint- again the homeowner did not
prime any wood substrates on the first go, which resulted in chasing
down a lot of peeling paint- mostly confined to the South and West
walls, and where the sprinklers got the house.  All detail moldings
required tedious scraping to remove the lifting paint from the absence
of primer.  2 primers were used to address specific adhesion and
appearance issues- Zinnser Cover Stain Oil, and XIM Peel Bond Primer.
Top Coats were sprayed and brushed using Rodda UltimateII.  Rodda is a
Pacific Northwest Paint Company, owned by Cloverdale Paints, a
Canadian Company.  Their Ultimate II is a 100% acrylic resin fortified
with urethane, and is a lifetime product.  It is a dream to apply, and
dries to a uniform finish regardless of application method.  Its color
retention and durability are impressive.


I almost didn't take this job, it was late in the season, the office
was instructed to let incoming calls for exterior work know we were
booked for the 2020 exterior season.  This wheat farmer of 6600 acres,
100 miles from my shop, ran me down on my cell phone and wanted to
explain to me why he was calling so late in the season and why he
needed to complete his project this year....  Farming is a profession
based on schedules that cannot be broken, or the result is a slim
harvest, or no harvest, which translates to little profit or no
profit.  Harvest starts late August and by mid to late September all
the wheat is in silos, this means the farmer knows the volume of the
harvest and the spot price for wheat.  But the farmer doesn't get paid
until he sells, which could be tomorrow, or it could be in 8 months,
when the price is right.  After listening to Ron and the reason he had
to have his job done, I realized Ron and I weren't that much different
in how our businesses ran....


We have good years and bad years, the money from this year's good year
may not be there for next year's bad year.  Plan accordingly and
invest in your business wisely

 


Our seasons are highly dependent on weather and other forces beyond
our control, such as Covid.

We have to make hay while the sun shines.... or wheat, or happy customers...

After listening to Ron tell me why his job was important to complete
this year, learning about his property and profession, and why he was
calling so late in the year. I felt obligated to help Ron, but I had
no crews to allocate.  We talked a little longer, I am not sure what
he said, but I agreed to throw on some whites (I wasn't even sure I
still had a pair), grabbed two of my best, and two of my newest and
headed to Harrington to run this job.  We started it 9 days ago and
will be complete Friday.

 

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